Bad Word! You Bad, Bad Word….

I found the word “cacology” on the cool website A.Word.A.Day, here she is! Cacology is a noun that means: 1. A poor choice of words or 2. The incorrect pronunciation of a word. Source: http://wordsmith.org/words/cacology.html

 

 

The etymology breaks down like this: from Greek kakologia: Gr. kako`s bad + -logy,: cf. F. cacologie, , from French cacologie, from cac- + -logie –logy. Its first known use was in 1615. Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cacology

 

 

 

Here’s a wordy quote to show the usage of cacology…

“The phenomena described in 1985 by Amos Joel, computer controlled digital switching system pioneer, are present realities: ‘The trade press, which should know better, is party to the curtain of mysticism, clichés, and cacology around which they shroud the true technology of new products.”-John Buckley; Telecommunications Regulation; Institution of Electrical Engineers; 2003.

How many models of electric cars are there?

According to Consumer Reports there are at least 24 plug-in vehicles on the market. For answers to your basic EV questions, checkout this comprehensive article at: http://www.consumerreports.org/hybrids-evs/electric-cars-101-the-answers-to-all-your-ev-questions/ (The link also provides a checklist in PDF form so you can ascertain whether going electric will suit your needs.)  The car makers that have invested in selling EVs include: Fiat, Mitsubishi, Chevrolet, Ford, Hyundai, Kia, Nissan, Toyota, Volkswagon, BMW, Mercedes, Tesla, Porsche and Chrysler.

 

Cutest Baby Animals- video

Here is a video of some cute baby animals! Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeet.

Wow, what a turn-out this morning, just look at all the countries enjoying the blog! (Click on the image to see a bigger picture.)

a fragile egg

“If there is a hard, high wall and an egg that breaks against it, no matter how right the wall or how wrong the egg, I will stand on the side of the egg. Why? Because each of us is an egg, a unique soul enclosed in a fragile egg. Each of us is confronting a high wall.”― Haruki Murakami –

Source: http://completelynovel.com/articles/a-bakers-dozen-of-egg-quotations#sthash.Q8gGLpm2.dpuf

Party Like a President

On my last birthday, my brother gave me a book about the US President’s drinking, gambling and carousing habits through the years. In it I found a recipe for syllabub, an olde English dessert, which was popular during James Monroe’s presidency.

Here’s the recipe: 2/3 c. white wine, 1/3 c. sherry, 2 T. grated lemon zest, ¼ c. lemon juice, 2/3 c. sugar, 2 c. heavy cream, fresh mint sprigs and berries. Mix the wine, sherry, lemon zest and lemon juice in a bowl. Stir in the sugar until dissolved.

 

 

In a separate bowl, whip the cream until the mixture forms into medium-size stiff peaks. Then, combine and stir with the wine mixture. Scoop the mixture into wineglasses. Cover the glasses and chill in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours. When ready to serve, top with the mint and berries.

 

 

Source: Party Like a President: True Tales of Inebriation, Lechery and Mischief from the Oval Office, By Brian Abrams. Workman Publishing. 2015

The Endless Power of the Ocean

Think about it, the ocean is moving 24/7/365. Between the waves and the tides, there is a constant source of renewable energy being generated, but not being harvested.  “Generating technologies for deriving electrical power from the ocean include tidal power, wave power, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), ocean currents, ocean winds and salinity gradients.

 

 

Of these, the three most well-developed technologies are tidal power, wave power and ocean thermal energy conversion. Tidal power requires large tidal differences which, in the U.S., occur only in Maine and Alaska. Ocean thermal energy conversion is limited to tropical regions, such as Hawaii, and to a portion of the Atlantic coast. Wave energy has a more general application, with potential along the California coast. The western coastline has the highest wave potential in the U.S.; in California, the greatest potential is along the northern coast.

 

 

California has more than 1,200 kilometers (745 miles) of coastline, and the combined average annual deep water wave power flux is over 37,000 megawatts (MW) of which an upper limit of about 20 percent could be converted into electricity. This is sufficient for about 23 percent of California’s current electricity consumption. However, economics, environmental impacts, land-use and grid interconnection constraints will likely impose further limits to how much of the resource can be extracted.

 

Although technology is still at a relatively immature pilot project stage, economic projections indicate that ocean energy could become cost-competitive over the long-term.”

Source: http://www.energy.ca.gov/oceanenergy/index.html