Join our Blog Jog Day!

I’ve noticed that our membership has dropped off sharply in the last few days, which made me remember a fun membership drive that I participated in a few years back.

 

 

It’s called “The Blog Jog” and it works like this: email your blog’s website address to me at rosefirewalker@aol.com. I’ll make a master list of all our blogs and post them on a thread for our Blog Jog day. By signing up to be on this list you will agree to visit each blog on Blog Jog Day and leave a short greeting on each blog.

 

 

It’s fun and it doesn’t take that much time. We’ll get a chance to see a lot of new and interesting writing from the other members here, and we’ll also get an intense amount of traffic to our own blogs.

You don’t have to subscribe to any of the blogs if you don’t want to, but you will be exposed to new authors, writers, and fellow networkers. It’ll be a blast and it’s only for the one day. Try it, try it, I say!!

You Pick Two

I chose today’s word, not because it is exotic or rare, but because it has two meanings that are wildly different from each other. I find that fascinating!

Solvent is both a noun and an adjective: As a noun, it means: 1. something that dissolves another thing, and 2. something that solves a problem.

 

 

As an adjective, it means: 1. able to pay one’s debts, and 2. able to dissolve another substance.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin solvere (to loosen, to dissolve, to pay). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pleu- (to flow), that is also the source of flow, float, flit, fly, flutter, pulmonary, pneumonic, pluvial, fluvial, effluvium, fletcher, and plutocracy. Earliest documented use: 1653.

Our word for today is from wordsmith.org, where you can sign up to receive a word a day via email!

Don’t be fooled by an old fool…

Solar power is big business!

In an article from PV TECH, I read that “The route to decarbonisation in the energy sector will create benefits of US$10 trillion every year by 2050, while requiring only US$1.8 trillion to implement, according to a new joint report from the International Energy Agency (IAE) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

 

 

 

In their first ever collaboration, IEA and IRENA found that a total of 6 million jobs would be created, even when accounting for jobs lost in other industries.

 

 

Further jobs will also be created in the energy efficiency sector. The report stressed that efforts on the transition need to be stepped up urgently to stay in line with the targets of the Paris Agreement.

 

 

IRENA director-general Adnan Z. Amin, said: “Critically, the economic case for the energy transition has never been stronger. Today around the world, new renewable power plants are being built that will generate electricity for less cost than fossil-fuel power plants. And through 2050, the decarbonisation can fuel sustainable economic growth and create more new jobs in renewables.”

Source: https://www.pv-tech.org/news/energy-transition-to-generate-us10-trillion-in-benefits-by-2050-iea-irena

March days

 “It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

Feel free to share a favorite quote with us, it doesn’t have to about the seasons!

Flightless Birds- Meet the Kakapo

Meet the kakapo, also known as an “owl parrot” is also a native of New Zealand. This nocturnal parrot has an owl’s face, penguin’s stance, and duck’s gait. It is truly a strange bird—but also a beautiful one, with bright green-brown feathers. It can grow up to 2 feet in length, and is the world’s heaviest parrot. The males make a distinctive booming call that sounds like a one-bird jug band, which can be heard up to half a mile away!

Source: https://www.britannica.com/list/8-birds-that-cant-fly

Beware the Ides of March

The Ides of March is a day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to March 15. In modern times, the Ides of March is best known as the date on which Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC. Caesar was stabbed to death at a meeting of the senate. As many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius, were involved. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to “beware the Ides of March.”

From a favorite Trivia site: http://triviatoday.com