Let’s Party!

Spring is nature’s way of saying, “Let’s party!”  ~Robin Williams

Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014) was an American stand-up comedian and actor. Starting as a stand-up comedian in San Francisco and Los Angeles in the mid-1970s, he is credited with leading San Francisco’s comedy renaissance.


After rising to fame as Mork in Mork & Mindy (1978–82), Williams established a career in both stand-up comedy and feature film acting. He was known for his improvisational skills.


After his first starring film role in Popeye (1980), Williams starred or co-starred in widely acclaimed films, including, Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), The Fisher King (1991), Aladdin (1992), Good Will Hunting (1997), and One Hour Photo (2002), as well as financial successes, such as Hook (1991), Mrs. Doubtfire (1993), Jumanji (1995), The Birdcage (1996), Night at the Museum (2006), and World’s Greatest Dad (2009).

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Williams

Beware the Ides of March

The Ides of March is a day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to March 15. In modern times, the Ides of March is best known as the date on which Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC. Caesar was stabbed to death at a meeting of the senate. As many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius, were involved. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to “beware the Ides of March.”

From a favorite Trivia site: http://triviatoday.com

A Sad Goodbye to Mary Tyler Moore

mary-tyler-moore1While watching the Mary Tyler Moore tribute, they used the word “eponymous” referring to her TV show, and I liked the sound of the word so I thought I’d share its meaning and origins with you.

Eponymous is an adjective meaning: 1. Of, relating to, or constituting an eponym, such as “The Mary Tyler Moore” Show.

 

 

he-man_12. Named after something else or deriving from an existing name or word: “Programs such as He-Man and Masters of the Universe … were all created with the explicit purpose of selling the eponymous toys to children”. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/eponymous

 

 

onyma-greek-wordEtymology notes: Eponymous comes from the Greek adjective epōnymos, which is itself from onyma, meaning “name.” “Onyma” has lent its name to a number of English words, including “synonymous,” “pseudonym,” and “anonymous.” Traditionally, an eponymous person or thing (i.e., an “eponym”) might be a mythical ancestor or totem believed to be the source of a clan’s name.

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eponymous

What good is the warmth of summer….

john-steinbeck2“What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”
John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America

I LOVE LUCY!

Lucille Ball

In 1971 she became the first woman to receive the International Radio and Television Society’s Gold Medal. In addition there were four Emmys, induction into the Television Hall of Fame and recognition for her life’s work from the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Source: http://www.biography.com/people/lucille-ball-9196958#i-love-lucy