Party Like a President

On my last birthday, my brother gave me a book about the US President’s drinking, gambling and carousing habits through the years. In it I found a recipe for syllabub, an olde English dessert, which was popular during James Monroe’s presidency.

Here’s the recipe: 2/3 c. white wine, 1/3 c. sherry, 2 T. grated lemon zest, ¼ c. lemon juice, 2/3 c. sugar, 2 c. heavy cream, fresh mint sprigs and berries. Mix the wine, sherry, lemon zest and lemon juice in a bowl. Stir in the sugar until dissolved.

 

 

In a separate bowl, whip the cream until the mixture forms into medium-size stiff peaks. Then, combine and stir with the wine mixture. Scoop the mixture into wineglasses. Cover the glasses and chill in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours. When ready to serve, top with the mint and berries.

 

 

Source: Party Like a President: True Tales of Inebriation, Lechery and Mischief from the Oval Office, By Brian Abrams. Workman Publishing. 2015

Bees Feed Us All!

bee-pollinating1Bees Facing Extinction and what it means to you…..

Bees pollinate most of the food we eat, so without bees, we will be in danger of starving. The prestigious publication, Reuters News Service, has plenty of well written articles on the scientific findings supporting the bee die off.

 

bee-pollinating2You can find an article on the Bee Die Off at http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-bees-idUSKBN1685NG

 

 

 

bee-pollinating3Bee happy, Bee healthy, protect our bees by using alternative means of protecting your flowers and food from pests. Stop using insecticide!

 

Gros Melons- Not what you think!

punkin3-sept-21-2015While doing a word search on the internet, I found this information on the word “pumpkin”,

which, coincidentally…….is the name of one of my cats!

 

 

squirrel on pumpkin-small

“During the crisp autumn months, pumpkins pop up everywhere — on our porches, in shop windows, and at the local farmer’s market.

 

 

 

melons-variety1They are part of the gourd family, along with cucumbers, honeydew, watermelon, cantaloupe, and zucchini. Pumpkins were originally called “gros melons“ by French explorer Jacques Cartier in 1584.

 

 

pumpkins-variety1

The English translation was “pompions,” which eventually evolved into our modern word, “pumpkin.” -By Caroline Young”

 

Berry good fruit!

More Native Plants You Can Eat

elderberriesElderberries: Native throughout much of the United States and Canada, they are pollinator magnets. The flowers eventually sprout into clusters of small red or dark purple berries that are gobbled up by birds and mammals. Though inedible to us when raw, cooked elderberries make a tangy pie, wine or jelly.

 

Wwild-grapesild Grapes: Few native fruits rival the wildlife value of wild grapes, which not only provide food but also nesting places for many birds in their tangled vines. Native to every contiguous U.S. state and from Nova Scotia west to Manitoba in Canada, wild grapes typically are smaller but much more flavorful than cultivated varieties. Two prized species are the northern fox grape, source of the famous Concord variety, and the scuppernong, a native of the South that can survive scorching temperatures and produce as much as 30 pounds of fruit yearly. The rampant vines can smother trees, so grow them on an arbor.

Source: http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Gardening/Archives/2013/Native-Plants-You-Can-Eat.aspx?s_email_id=20151114_MEM_ENG_Habitat_News_November_Edition|MTMemHab

Have a Berry Good Day!

Raspberries, Blackberries and Salmonberries, Oh My!

brambles“These and other native brambles—shrubs that send up arching stems called canes—are perfect garden plants. They’re easy to grow, but they’re highly perishable, so the fruits can be hard to find in supermarkets.

 

Birdshummingbird and mammals feed on them, while the flowers provide nectar for pollinators and the leaves are an essential food source for skipper butterfly larvae.

 

raspberriesThe red raspberry is native to every region of the Lower 48 except the Deep South. The black raspberry ranges throughout the East as far south as Georgia and from North Dakota south to Colorado and Oklahoma. The common, or Allegheny, blackberry grows in the Northeast and Midwest and south to Virginia and Missouri. California blackberry, also called dewberry, is native to the Pacific Northwest.

salmonberriesThe salmonberry is a favorite of western hummingbird species.Named for their resemblance to salmon roe, the fruits taste best when they are amber-colored.”

 

Source: http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Gardening/Archives/2013/Native-Plants-You-Can-Eat.aspx?s_email_id=20151114_MEM_ENG_Habitat_News_November_Edition|MTMemHab

The Pawpaw- A fruit with its own festival!

Ohio Pawapw festival 2016The 18th Annual Ohio Pawpaw Festival will take place September 16-18, 2016 at scenic Lake Snowden in Albany, Ohio for 3 days of Pawpaw music, food, contests, art, history, education, sustainable living workshops and activities. For more information about the festival, go to: http://ohiopawpawfest.com/

 

pawpawsAbout Pawpaws: Producing the largest edible fruit of any North American native plant, pawpaw shrubs or small trees grow from New York to Iowa and south from Florida to Texas. Up to 6 inches long and shaped similar to potatoes, the fruits turn yellow and black when ripe in the fall. They have a custard like consistency and taste like a combination of mango, banana and pineapple. Birds and certain mammals feed on the fruits, and the trees are the host plant of zebra swallowtail butterflies.

Source: http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Gardening/Archives/2013/Native-Plants-You-Can-Eat.aspx?s_email_id=20151114_MEM_ENG_Habitat_News_November_Edition|MTMemHab

Native Plants you can Eat #2

SpringThese are Native plants you can grow in your garden this spring and then enjoy the fruits of your labor during holiday meals and other times.

 

blueberriesBlueberries: While cultivated varieties have been developed from the highbush blueberry, which grows wild in the East and Midwest, other blueberry species are native to most of the United States and Canada. The shrubs produce small flowers that are important spring nectar sources for bees while their intense, sweet-tart flavored berries are relished by many birds and mammals.

service berriesServiceberries: Some species of serviceberry—also known as Juneberry, shadbush or Saskatoon—is native to every contiguous U.S. state and Canadian province. The large shrubs or small trees feature delicate white flowers on bare branches in spring that provide nectar for insects emerging from winter nests. The small, purple fruits help sustain grosbeaks, thrushes and many other birds during the breeding season. If you can get to them before the birds, the uniquely flavored berries can be used to make jam or pie.

persimmonsAmerican Persimmons: Native from Connecticut to Iowa and Kansas south to Florida and Texas, American persimmon trees produce ornamental, purplish-orange fruits that hang on leafless branches in autumn. Before they ripen, the fruits are guaranteed to make your mouth pucker. But when ripe, they taste a lot like dates. Wild persimmons are an important fall and winter food for many mammals, and the trees are a larval host plant for the luna moth.

Source: http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Gardening/Archives/2013/Native-Plants-You-Can-Eat.aspx?s_email_id=20151114_MEM_ENG_Habitat_News_November_Edition|MTMemHab