Flightless Birds- Meet the Kakapo

Meet the kakapo, also known as an “owl parrot” is also a native of New Zealand. This nocturnal parrot has an owl’s face, penguin’s stance, and duck’s gait. It is truly a strange bird—but also a beautiful one, with bright green-brown feathers. It can grow up to 2 feet in length, and is the world’s heaviest parrot. The males make a distinctive booming call that sounds like a one-bird jug band, which can be heard up to half a mile away!

Source: https://www.britannica.com/list/8-birds-that-cant-fly

My guiding star

Lodestar is a noun meaning: someone or something that serves as a guiding principle, model, inspiration, ambition, etc.

 

 

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English lad (way) + star. A lodestar is called so because it’s used in navigation, it shows the way. Earliest documented use: 1374

 

“He was her rock, the lodestar on which she could focus.” Laura Benedict; Bliss House; Pegasus Books; 2014.

Our word for today is from wordsmith.org, where you can sign up to receive a word a day via email!

I saw a seagull flying far from home

seagull1I live in Pasadena, so it’s surprising to me to see so many shore birds in the city. Near the Panera Restaurant where I like to have breakfast there are a group of seagulls that inhabit the parking lot, so I thought I’d find out what animal medicine these birds are attributed with. Here’s what I found:

“Seagulls are spiritual messengers that demonstrate that a higher communication with guides is taking place. He shows how to see above situations with a higher clarity and teaches that there are many perspectives to consider.

seagulls1Seagull shows a sense friendship and community and the cooperation that is needed for the whole to operate successfully. He teaches how to ride the currents of the mental, emotional and physical worlds. Are you going with the flow or fighting it? Are you cooperating with others? Are you open to your guides? Seagull can teach you many lessons of looking, living and being. It is time to listen and watch for the nuances and timing of action.”  Source: http://www.starstuffs.com/animal_totems/dictionary_of_birds.html

 

Gros Melons- Not what you think!

punkin3-sept-21-2015While doing a word search on the internet, I found this information on the word “pumpkin”,

which, coincidentally…….is the name of one of my cats!

 

 

squirrel on pumpkin-small

“During the crisp autumn months, pumpkins pop up everywhere — on our porches, in shop windows, and at the local farmer’s market.

 

 

 

melons-variety1They are part of the gourd family, along with cucumbers, honeydew, watermelon, cantaloupe, and zucchini. Pumpkins were originally called “gros melons“ by French explorer Jacques Cartier in 1584.

 

 

pumpkins-variety1

The English translation was “pompions,” which eventually evolved into our modern word, “pumpkin.” -By Caroline Young”