The Endless Power of the Ocean

Think about it, the ocean is moving 24/7/365. Between the waves and the tides, there is a constant source of renewable energy being generated, but not being harvested.  “Generating technologies for deriving electrical power from the ocean include tidal power, wave power, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), ocean currents, ocean winds and salinity gradients.

 

 

Of these, the three most well-developed technologies are tidal power, wave power and ocean thermal energy conversion. Tidal power requires large tidal differences which, in the U.S., occur only in Maine and Alaska. Ocean thermal energy conversion is limited to tropical regions, such as Hawaii, and to a portion of the Atlantic coast. Wave energy has a more general application, with potential along the California coast. The western coastline has the highest wave potential in the U.S.; in California, the greatest potential is along the northern coast.

 

 

California has more than 1,200 kilometers (745 miles) of coastline, and the combined average annual deep water wave power flux is over 37,000 megawatts (MW) of which an upper limit of about 20 percent could be converted into electricity. This is sufficient for about 23 percent of California’s current electricity consumption. However, economics, environmental impacts, land-use and grid interconnection constraints will likely impose further limits to how much of the resource can be extracted.

 

Although technology is still at a relatively immature pilot project stage, economic projections indicate that ocean energy could become cost-competitive over the long-term.”

Source: http://www.energy.ca.gov/oceanenergy/index.html

Geothermal energy is cheaper than Natural Gas

Here are three reasons why natural gas is more expensive than geothermal energy:

  1. It is consumable (consumed in the process of creating heat)
  2. Combustion heating creates Green House Gas emissions
  3. It is subject to carbon taxes

 

 

Meanwhile, geothermal heat pumps are the opposite of natural gas:

  1. Geothermal is renewable (the solar energy stored in the earth is continually replenished)
  2. Geothermal creates no Green House Gas emissions (no combustion on site)
  3. Geothermal isn’t charged carbon taxes, so it’s more affordable.

 

To learn more about geothermal vs. natural gas, check out: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2017/01/can-natural-gas-giants-switch-to-geothermal.html?cmpid=enl_rew_geothermalenergynews_2017-01-26

 

 

Don’t lose heart my dear ones, here is a snippet showing our blog stats for today! Not only do we have a great showing for this post, it’s from all over the world.

And it’s delightful!!!!!

PS. I know it looks hazy, but click on the jpg and it will show you the details in full.

Don’t be fooled by an old fool…

Solar power is big business!

In an article from PV TECH, I read that “The route to decarbonisation in the energy sector will create benefits of US$10 trillion every year by 2050, while requiring only US$1.8 trillion to implement, according to a new joint report from the International Energy Agency (IAE) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

 

 

 

In their first ever collaboration, IEA and IRENA found that a total of 6 million jobs would be created, even when accounting for jobs lost in other industries.

 

 

Further jobs will also be created in the energy efficiency sector. The report stressed that efforts on the transition need to be stepped up urgently to stay in line with the targets of the Paris Agreement.

 

 

IRENA director-general Adnan Z. Amin, said: “Critically, the economic case for the energy transition has never been stronger. Today around the world, new renewable power plants are being built that will generate electricity for less cost than fossil-fuel power plants. And through 2050, the decarbonisation can fuel sustainable economic growth and create more new jobs in renewables.”

Source: https://www.pv-tech.org/news/energy-transition-to-generate-us10-trillion-in-benefits-by-2050-iea-irena

British Petroleum buys jet fuel made from Garbage

bp-logo1“BP Plc (British Petroleum Public Limited Company) will invest $30 million in Fulcrum BioEnergy Inc., which makes biofuel from garbage, in a new partnership designed to curb airplane pollution. The London-based oil-producer also signed a 10-year deal to buy 500 million gallons (1.9 billion liters) of biofuel from Fulcrum’s North American plants, according to a statement by BP on Tuesday. BP will distribute the aviation fuel to planes through its unit Air BP Ltd., which sells about 7 billion gallons of aviation fuel annually.

airplane1Airlines facing pressure to clean up their pollution last month brokered a landmark deal in Montreal. Their accord created a global system that requires them to fund environmental initiatives from 2020 that may cost as much as $24 billion annually by 2035.” By Jessica Shankleman, Bloomberg, November 2016

Source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2016/11/bp-buys-jet-fuel-made-from-garbage.html

America is growing more energy independent!

flintridRenewable Energy World, one of the leading publications in the RE business just ran an encouraging story about the RE market.

“Renewable energy accounted for the majority (50.5 percent) of new U.S. electrical generation put into service during the first 11 months of 2016, according to the latest issue of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) monthly Energy Infrastructure Update (with data through Nov. 30, 2016).

biomass-power-plant1Combined, newly installed capacity from renewable sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, wind) totaled 9,655 MW, surpassing that from natural gas (8,109 MW), nuclear power (1,270 MW), coal (45 MW), and oil (33 MW) combined.

 

wind-power1The rapid growth of renewables — particularly solar and wind — has resulted in their seizing an ever-growing share of the nation’s total generating capacity. Five years ago, renewable sources cumulatively accounted for slightly over 14 percent of total available installed generating capacity; now they provide almost 19 percent (18.69 percent): hydropower, 8.53 percent; wind, 6.58 percent; solar, 1.84 percent; biomass, 1.41 percent; and geothermal, 0.33 percent.”

Story source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2017/01/renewables-provide-majority-of-new-us-generating-capacity-through-november-2016.html?cmpid=enl_REW_GEOTHERMALENERGYNEWS_2017-01-12

Massachusetts adopts bill for massive wind and hydropower projects

Massachusetts flag“The comprehensive energy bill adopted this week by the Massachusetts legislature includes a provision requiring the state’s utilities to enter into long-term contracts to purchase both offshore wind and hydropower by 2027.

 

offshore_wind_energy in Virginia 2015In addition to the 1,600 MW mandate for offshore wind, utilities would have to purchase an additional 9.45 million MWh of power annually from new Class I resources and hydropower,” writes Jennifer Delony, Associate Editor of Renewable Energy World magazine.

This move toward clean energy will create jobs and help keep the environment livable.

Source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2016/08/states-in-us-northeast-prioritize-renewable-energy.html?cmpid=renewablewind0842016&eid=326825548&bid=1486924

Renewable Energy Works!

peopleoftheworldAccording to a report released on May 25, 2016 by the International Renewable Energy Agency “more than 8.1 million people worldwide are now employed by the renewable energy industry — a five percent increase from last year.

 

china flagThe countries with the most renewable energy jobs in 2015 included China, Brazil, the U.S., India, Japan and Germany.

 

Brazil flagThe solar PV sector remains the largest renewable energy employer worldwide, with 2.8 million jobs in manufacturing, installation and operations and maintenance.”

Way to go GREEN!

Source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2016/05/renewable-energy-job-growth-unique-in-global-energy-sector.html