The pet trade is killing off animals

The pet trade is killing off animal species at an alarming rate, according to an article by Alice Catherine Hughes, writing for U.S. News.

In an excerpt from a recent article, she writes:

 

 

”Nearly 1.5 million animals were imported live to the U.S. between 2000 and 2006 for the pet trade. Global biodiversity loss doesn’t just result from the destruction of habitats, or hunting species for meat. A huge number of species are threatened by trade – as pets or exhibits, or dead for use in medicines.

 

 

Though people have become increasingly aware of the threat posed by the trade of high-value species, such as the elephant for ivory, and various animals such as tigers, rhinos and the pangolin for medicine, few realize the risk that the pet trade poses to the future survival of less well-known species.”

 

 

Read the whole article at: https://www.usnews.com/news/best-countries/articles/2017-02-08/how-the-pet-trade-is-killing-off-animal-species

Flightless Birds- Meet the Kakapo

Meet the kakapo, also known as an “owl parrot” is also a native of New Zealand. This nocturnal parrot has an owl’s face, penguin’s stance, and duck’s gait. It is truly a strange bird—but also a beautiful one, with bright green-brown feathers. It can grow up to 2 feet in length, and is the world’s heaviest parrot. The males make a distinctive booming call that sounds like a one-bird jug band, which can be heard up to half a mile away!

Source: https://www.britannica.com/list/8-birds-that-cant-fly

Bees Feed Us All!

bee-pollinating1Bees Facing Extinction and what it means to you…..

Bees pollinate most of the food we eat, so without bees, we will be in danger of starving. The prestigious publication, Reuters News Service, has plenty of well written articles on the scientific findings supporting the bee die off.

 

bee-pollinating2You can find an article on the Bee Die Off at http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-bees-idUSKBN1685NG

 

 

 

bee-pollinating3Bee happy, Bee healthy, protect our bees by using alternative means of protecting your flowers and food from pests. Stop using insecticide!

 

I saw a seagull flying far from home

seagull1I live in Pasadena, so it’s surprising to me to see so many shore birds in the city. Near the Panera Restaurant where I like to have breakfast there are a group of seagulls that inhabit the parking lot, so I thought I’d find out what animal medicine these birds are attributed with. Here’s what I found:

“Seagulls are spiritual messengers that demonstrate that a higher communication with guides is taking place. He shows how to see above situations with a higher clarity and teaches that there are many perspectives to consider.

seagulls1Seagull shows a sense friendship and community and the cooperation that is needed for the whole to operate successfully. He teaches how to ride the currents of the mental, emotional and physical worlds. Are you going with the flow or fighting it? Are you cooperating with others? Are you open to your guides? Seagull can teach you many lessons of looking, living and being. It is time to listen and watch for the nuances and timing of action.”  Source: http://www.starstuffs.com/animal_totems/dictionary_of_birds.html

 

Don’t eat that angletwitch

earthwormAn angletwitch is an earthworm, the word originated in 14th century Merry Olde England from: Middle English angeltwicche, angeltwacche, from Old English angeltwæcce, angeltwicce, from angel hook + -twæcce, -twicce (from twiccian to pluck, catch hold of). Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/angletwitch

 

weird-and-wonderful-words-book-coverThis word was found in the wonderful and often hilarious book: Weird and Wonderful Words, edited by Erin McKean

 

What weird and wonderful words do you have to share today? Please post them in the comments section with their meanings!!

I’m dreaming of a Green Christmas#1!!

merry-christmas-sign1There are lots of ways to enjoy the holidays without leaving a negative impact on our fragile environment. Here are ten fun tips on Greening your Christmas this year:

 

 

Buy a livchristmas-2013-2e tree that you can decorate this year, and then plant in your backyard with your kids, and watch it grow as they grow! We have a Norfolk Pine and another two pine trees in our yard that were originally Christmas trees. Each tree lasts about three years in its pot, so you can use it over and over again before planting it. Donate your live tree to an organization in your community that’s dedicated to planting trees, like the Arbor Day Society or the Boy/Girl Scouts.

 

christmas-tree-12-25-11Tip: If you do buy a cut tree, remember, the city can’t recycle them into compost if they have: flocking, tinsel “icicles” or Christmas ornaments still attached to them. Remove all decorations and get them on the curb in time to be recycled by your local waste department after Christmas.

 

 

baskets1Send your gifts in festively decorated baskets that can be wrapped in colored cellophane. This will save buying a mountain of wrapping paper that will become trash in an instant. The baskets can be reused again for gifts the next year!

 

 

 

xmas-cards-2007If you save Christmas cards like I do, you may not want to throw them away, and can’t figure out how to reuse them. Here’s a tip: you can tape them onto your gift boxes, creating colorful, original wrapped gifts, without using wrapping paper.

 

 

computerHave fun with the kids by using your computer’s printer/scanner/copier to make your own wrapping paper. Lay out your old Christmas cards in a fanciful arrangement and copy them, then use the sheets of homemade wrapping paper for the smaller gifts.

 

Add your own green Christmas tips here!