The Cost of Maintaining an Electric Vehicle

If you’re wondering if buying an electric car is worth the price tag, here are two articles that can help you compare costs. This article discusses some factors that affect the cost of maintaining an EV (electric vehicle): http://www.plugincars.com/eight-factors-determining-total-cost-ownership-electric-car-127528.html

 

Jeffrey Chu wrote an article comparing the maintenance, fuel and insurance costs of EV vs Hybrids vs Gas cars: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/electric-hybrid-gas-how-they-compare-costs-2015/

Let’s Make Waves

There are several technologies that help convert the energy of the ocean into electric power, one of them is WEC or Wave Energy Conversion. “Ocean wave energy can be captured directly from surface waves. Blowing wind and pressure fluctuations below the surface are the main reasons for causing waves. But consistency of waves differs from one area of ocean to another.

 

Some regions of oceans receive waves with enough uniformity and force” that the energy can be harnessed. Scientists are currently using the wave power of oceans to harness clean, green energy.

 

 

Read more at: http://www.theoceanenergy.com/news/2-new-innovative-ocean-wave-energy-devices.html

UK produces 25% of their Electricity with Solar Power

According to an article in Renewable Energy World, on May 26, 2017 the UK hit a new record, producing 8.75 GW of solar power, breaking a previous record of 8.49 GW, overtaking nuclear power in the country.

 

 

“The CEO of the UK Solar Trade Association (STA), Paul Barwell, said in a statement that the organization was “delighted that at around midday today 8.75 GW was generated by solar, supplying nearly 25 percent of the UK’s total demand. This is the first time that solar has generated more than nuclear, second only to gas. This is a colossal achievement in just 5 years, and sends a very positive message to the UK that solar has a strong place in the decarbonisation of the UK energy sector.”

 

Source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2017/05/u-k-breaks-solar-record-generates-24-percent-of-power-from-solar.html

The Pros and Cons of Biofuel

I found an interesting article on “The Pros and Cons of Biofuel” and thought you might like to read it.

“There are many environmental benefits to replacing oil with plant-based biofuels like ethanol and biodiesel. For one, since such fuels are derived from agricultural crops, they are inherently renewable—and our own farmers typically produce them domestically, reducing our dependence on unstable foreign sources of oil.

 

Additionally, ethanol and biodiesel emit less particulate pollution than traditional petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuels. They also do not have much of a net contribution of greenhouse gases to the global climate change problem, since they only emit back to the environment the carbon dioxide that their source plants absorbed out of the atmosphere in the first place.” Source: https://www.thoughtco.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-biofuels-1203797?utm_term=biofuels+journal&utm_content=p1-main-1-title&utm_medium=sem&utm_source=msn_s&utm_campaign=adid-f612939a-48bb-43e7-a324-12ce60486b63-0-ab_msb_ocode-35517&ad=semD&an=msn_s&am=broad&q=biofuels+journal&o=35517&qsrc=999&l=sem&askid=f612939a-48bb-43e7-a324-12ce60486b63-0-ab_msb

Wind Energy Replaces Diesel Plant!

Block Island Wind Farm

This May, the 2,000 residents of Block Island, Rhode Island are making a fresh start when it comes to powering their lives. As of May 1, Block Island is the first location in the U.S. to be powered by an offshore wind farm — a wind farm that has eliminated the need for a diesel plant that was burning about one million gallons of dirty diesel fuel annually. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), diesel produces more carbon emissions than every other fossil fuel except for fuel oil.

 

The Block Island Wind Farm is intended to bring significant change, and not just on Block Island. The project was designed to serve as an example of the tremendous potential that offshore wind power holds for the United States. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has created a wind resource assessment and characterization study, which depicts this potential.- Excerpt from an article by Karla Lant

Source: https://futurism.com/the-first-offshore-wind-farm-in-the-u-s-just-shut-down-a-diesel-plant/

The energy in the Earth

Geothermal energy is heating up in Nevada!

In July 2016, US Geothermal began drilling at their San Emidio project in Nevada. “They drilled to a depth of 1,000 feet and encountered high bottom hole temperatures and high temperature gradients. Both of those findings are indicators of a deeper, active geothermal system, the company said, adding that, if productive zones are encountered, the wells will be tested to determine resource temperature and production characteristics in the area.

 

Phase I of the San Emidio project was completed in 2012, when an existing 3.6 MW plant was replaced with a more efficient 9 MW power plant.”

Source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2016/07/drilling-scheduled-to-deepen-two-geothermal-wells-at-san-emidio-in-nevada.html?cmpid=renewablegeothermal07142016&eid=326825548&bid=1459832

The Endless Power of the Ocean

Think about it, the ocean is moving 24/7/365. Between the waves and the tides, there is a constant source of renewable energy being generated, but not being harvested.  “Generating technologies for deriving electrical power from the ocean include tidal power, wave power, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), ocean currents, ocean winds and salinity gradients.

 

 

Of these, the three most well-developed technologies are tidal power, wave power and ocean thermal energy conversion. Tidal power requires large tidal differences which, in the U.S., occur only in Maine and Alaska. Ocean thermal energy conversion is limited to tropical regions, such as Hawaii, and to a portion of the Atlantic coast. Wave energy has a more general application, with potential along the California coast. The western coastline has the highest wave potential in the U.S.; in California, the greatest potential is along the northern coast.

 

 

California has more than 1,200 kilometers (745 miles) of coastline, and the combined average annual deep water wave power flux is over 37,000 megawatts (MW) of which an upper limit of about 20 percent could be converted into electricity. This is sufficient for about 23 percent of California’s current electricity consumption. However, economics, environmental impacts, land-use and grid interconnection constraints will likely impose further limits to how much of the resource can be extracted.

 

Although technology is still at a relatively immature pilot project stage, economic projections indicate that ocean energy could become cost-competitive over the long-term.”

Source: http://www.energy.ca.gov/oceanenergy/index.html