Another word that just popped into my crazy brain!

A lollapalooza (n.) means “a remarkable or wonderful person or thing”, which is a term that originated in either 1896 or 1901 from American English, also meaning “a fanciful formation”.  Other spellings include: lallapaloosa and lallapalootza.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=lollapalooza

 

 

Google tells us “Lollapalooza is the annual North American alternative pop music concert which started around 1991. It’s a music festival featuring alternative rock, heavy metal, punk rock, hip hop, Electric Dance Music bands, artists, dance and comedy performances and craft booths. It happens in Grant Park, Chicago, IL on Aug 3 – 6, 2017 and has been active for 20 years!”

Let’s Party!

Spring is nature’s way of saying, “Let’s party!”  ~Robin Williams

Robin McLaurin Williams (July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014) was an American stand-up comedian and actor. Starting as a stand-up comedian in San Francisco and Los Angeles in the mid-1970s, he is credited with leading San Francisco’s comedy renaissance.


After rising to fame as Mork in Mork & Mindy (1978–82), Williams established a career in both stand-up comedy and feature film acting. He was known for his improvisational skills.


After his first starring film role in Popeye (1980), Williams starred or co-starred in widely acclaimed films, including, Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), The Fisher King (1991), Aladdin (1992), Good Will Hunting (1997), and One Hour Photo (2002), as well as financial successes, such as Hook (1991), Mrs. Doubtfire (1993), Jumanji (1995), The Birdcage (1996), Night at the Museum (2006), and World’s Greatest Dad (2009).

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Williams

My ideal…insect

This is a strange word, it has two completely unrelated meanings…which I find fascinating! Let me know if you agree….

Imago is a noun, meaning:
1. The final or adult stage of an insect.

 

 

2. An idealized image of someone, formed in childhood and persisting in later life.

Etymology: From Latin imago (image). Ultimately from the Indo-European root aim- (copy), which also gave us emulate, imitate, image, imagine, and emulous. Earliest documented use: 1787. Source: http://wordsmith.org/words/imago.html

 

 

Our word for today is from wordsmith.org, where you can sign up to receive a word a day via email!