March days

 “It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 

Feel free to share a favorite quote with us, it doesn’t have to about the seasons!

Flightless Birds- Meet the Kakapo

Meet the kakapo, also known as an “owl parrot” is also a native of New Zealand. This nocturnal parrot has an owl’s face, penguin’s stance, and duck’s gait. It is truly a strange bird—but also a beautiful one, with bright green-brown feathers. It can grow up to 2 feet in length, and is the world’s heaviest parrot. The males make a distinctive booming call that sounds like a one-bird jug band, which can be heard up to half a mile away!

Source: https://www.britannica.com/list/8-birds-that-cant-fly

Beware the Ides of March

The Ides of March is a day on the Roman calendar that corresponds to March 15. In modern times, the Ides of March is best known as the date on which Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC. Caesar was stabbed to death at a meeting of the senate. As many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius, were involved. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to “beware the Ides of March.”

From a favorite Trivia site: http://triviatoday.com

My guiding star

Lodestar is a noun meaning: someone or something that serves as a guiding principle, model, inspiration, ambition, etc.

 

 

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English lad (way) + star. A lodestar is called so because it’s used in navigation, it shows the way. Earliest documented use: 1374

 

“He was her rock, the lodestar on which she could focus.” Laura Benedict; Bliss House; Pegasus Books; 2014.

Our word for today is from wordsmith.org, where you can sign up to receive a word a day via email!

Women’s History Month- Meet the leaders among Women

In 1987, Congress designated the month of March as Women’s History Month. Since that time, U.S. Presidents have issued annual proclamations designating the month of March to continue as Women’s History Month. Women who came before us, and those who work among us, now have made some of the most important contributions to our basic life conditions: safeguarding the water we drink, the air we breathe, and the places we play.
To celebrate the achievements of women, the Council for Watershed Health is launching an educational effort to highlight the influential work of women in the environmental community to inspire future generations of leaders. One of the most important and complex challenges facing Los Angeles residents today is the safety and resilience of our local water supplies.
From boardrooms to courtrooms, community spaces and natural places across Los Angeles, women are leading the effort to ensure our water future is safe and secure for decades to come. As a result of their efforts to diligently advance the health and sustainability of our regions watershed across various fields, we know the future of LA water is female.
The first female water leader we would like recognize is none other than our very own fearless leader, Dorothy Green. To learn more about Dorothy’s work head to our blog, Thinking Upstream.

Bees Feed Us All!

bee-pollinating1Bees Facing Extinction and what it means to you…..

Bees pollinate most of the food we eat, so without bees, we will be in danger of starving. The prestigious publication, Reuters News Service, has plenty of well written articles on the scientific findings supporting the bee die off.

 

bee-pollinating2You can find an article on the Bee Die Off at http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-bees-idUSKBN1685NG

 

 

 

bee-pollinating3Bee happy, Bee healthy, protect our bees by using alternative means of protecting your flowers and food from pests. Stop using insecticide!