Native Plants you can Eat #2

SpringThese are Native plants you can grow in your garden this spring and then enjoy the fruits of your labor during holiday meals and other times.

 

blueberriesBlueberries: While cultivated varieties have been developed from the highbush blueberry, which grows wild in the East and Midwest, other blueberry species are native to most of the United States and Canada. The shrubs produce small flowers that are important spring nectar sources for bees while their intense, sweet-tart flavored berries are relished by many birds and mammals.

service berriesServiceberries: Some species of serviceberry—also known as Juneberry, shadbush or Saskatoon—is native to every contiguous U.S. state and Canadian province. The large shrubs or small trees feature delicate white flowers on bare branches in spring that provide nectar for insects emerging from winter nests. The small, purple fruits help sustain grosbeaks, thrushes and many other birds during the breeding season. If you can get to them before the birds, the uniquely flavored berries can be used to make jam or pie.

persimmonsAmerican Persimmons: Native from Connecticut to Iowa and Kansas south to Florida and Texas, American persimmon trees produce ornamental, purplish-orange fruits that hang on leafless branches in autumn. Before they ripen, the fruits are guaranteed to make your mouth pucker. But when ripe, they taste a lot like dates. Wild persimmons are an important fall and winter food for many mammals, and the trees are a larval host plant for the luna moth.

Source: http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Gardening/Archives/2013/Native-Plants-You-Can-Eat.aspx?s_email_id=20151114_MEM_ENG_Habitat_News_November_Edition|MTMemHab

Spring Fever

“It’s SForestpring fever.  That is what the name of it is.  And when you’ve got it, you want – oh, you don’t quite know what it is you do want, but it just fairly makes your heart ache, you want it so!” Mark Twain

Spring is my favorite season

my tea garden-ex“I think that no matter how old or infirm I may become, I will always plant a large garden in the spring. Who can resist the feelings of hope and joy that one gets from participating in nature’s rebirth?”  – Edward Giobbi

Spring has sprung!

home grown peaches-ex“Spring is when life’s alive in everything.”
Christina Rossetti

 

 

early peas“Spring has returned. The Earth is like a child that knows poems.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

 

 

Chrysanthemum“The beautiful spring came;
and when Nature resumes her loveliness,
the human soul is apt to revive also.”
Harriet Ann Jacobs

beautiful Spring quotes

Chrysanthemum“The beautiful spring came;
and when Nature resumes her loveliness,
the human soul is apt to revive also.”
Harriet Ann Jacobs

And now a bit about Ms. Jacobs:

“I want to add my testimony to that of abler pens to convince the people of the Free States what slavery really is. Only by experience can any one realize how deep, and dark, and foul is that pit of abominations.”

After nearly seven years hiding in a tiny garret above her grandmother’s home, Harriet Ann Jacobs took a step other slaves dared to dream in 1842; she secretly boarded a boat in Edenton, N.C., bound for Philadelphia, New York and, eventually, freedom. The young slave woman’s flight, and the events leading up to it, are documented in heart-wrenching detail in her autobiography, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself, self-published in 1861 under the pseudonym Linda Brent.

Happy Imbolc- Feb. 2nd!!

Happy Imbolc on February 2nd!

Imbolc (also Imbolg or Oimelc), or St Brigid’s Day (Scots Gaelic Là Fhèill Brìghde, Irish Lá Fhéile Bríde, the feast day of St. Brigid), is an Irish festival marking the beginning of spring. Most commonly it is celebrated on February 1 or 2 (or February 12, according to the Old Calendar), which falls halfway between the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox in the northern hemisphere.[1][2]

The festival was observed in Gaelic Ireland during the Middle Ages. Reference to Imbolc is made in Irish mythology, in the Tochmarc Emire of the Ulster Cycle.[3] Imbolc was one of the four cross-quarter days referred to in Irish mythology, the others being Beltane, Lughnasadh and Samhain.[4] It has been suggested that it was originally a pagan festival associated with the goddess Brigid, who was later Christianised as St. Brigid.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imbolc