Party Like a President

On my last birthday, my brother gave me a book about the US President’s drinking, gambling and carousing habits through the years. In it I found a recipe for syllabub, an olde English dessert, which was popular during James Monroe’s presidency.

Here’s the recipe: 2/3 c. white wine, 1/3 c. sherry, 2 T. grated lemon zest, ¼ c. lemon juice, 2/3 c. sugar, 2 c. heavy cream, fresh mint sprigs and berries. Mix the wine, sherry, lemon zest and lemon juice in a bowl. Stir in the sugar until dissolved.

 

 

In a separate bowl, whip the cream until the mixture forms into medium-size stiff peaks. Then, combine and stir with the wine mixture. Scoop the mixture into wineglasses. Cover the glasses and chill in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours. When ready to serve, top with the mint and berries.

 

 

Source: Party Like a President: True Tales of Inebriation, Lechery and Mischief from the Oval Office, By Brian Abrams. Workman Publishing. 2015

The Death Star

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Cagastrical is an adjective used to describe diseases such as plague and fever, which were once thought to be caused by the influence of malignant stars.

 

 

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(No, I am not making this up, although I am a fan of Star Wars movies!) The word comes from Greek root words meaning “evil star”.

 

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This word was found in the wonderful and often hilarious book:  Weird and Wonderful Words, edited by Erin McKean

Do your balistrarias need reinforcing?

balistraria1A balistraria is the name of the cross-shaped holes in the walls of fortresses and castles, through which weapons such as crossbows (also known as arbalests) could be fired.

It is also the name of the room in your castle where you would keep the arbalests or crosswbows.

 

 

crossbow-and-arrows

By The Way, if you’re able to fire an arbalest, you’d be called a balistrier!

This word was found in the wonderful and often hilarious book: Weird and Wonderful Words, edited by Erin McKean

Don’t eat that angletwitch

earthwormAn angletwitch is an earthworm, the word originated in 14th century Merry Olde England from: Middle English angeltwicche, angeltwacche, from Old English angeltwæcce, angeltwicce, from angel hook + -twæcce, -twicce (from twiccian to pluck, catch hold of). Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/angletwitch

 

weird-and-wonderful-words-book-coverThis word was found in the wonderful and often hilarious book: Weird and Wonderful Words, edited by Erin McKean

 

What weird and wonderful words do you have to share today? Please post them in the comments section with their meanings!!

Let us worship words!

oliver-wendell-holmes-sr-quoteOur word for today was found in a page in the Reader’s Digest:  epeolatry, meaning, the worship of words.

Etymology: From Greek, epos (word) + -latry (worship).

 

oliver-wendell-holmes-sr-1The first citation of the word is from Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., in his 1860 book Professor at the Breakfast Table.

For another cool source for new words, visit: http://wordsmith.org/words/epeolatry.html

my lizard ate my homework

salamander1Sorry about the late post, I’ve been very sick with a massive cold, and been away from the keyboard of life!

It’s a lizard…it’s a man…it’s a political trick…meet the gerrymander.

 

 

gerrymander-mapThe noun, gerrymander, as used in U.S. politics, means: “the dividing of a state, county, etc., into election districts so as to give one political party a majority in many districts while concentrating the voting strength of the other party into as few districts as possible. As a verb (used with object) it means: to subject (a state, county, etc.) to a gerrymander.”

 

 

 

salamander2The origin of the word is interesting; it was created in 1812, after E. Gerry (governor of Massachusetts, whose party redistricted the state in 1812) + (sala)mander, from the fancied resemblance of the map of Essex County, Mass., to this animal, after the redistricting.

dictionary-genericSource: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/gerrymandering

Bugs and Viruses

contract1If you really want to blow your own mind, read legal contracts all the way through. They have a plethora (cool word alert!) of new words you can look up and ponder.

 

time-bomb1Just for fun, I read the Angie’s List contract all the way through, it’s a doozy and has lots of new words in it. Here are some computer viruses that the contract says the company is not responsible for if they infect your computer through their website.

 

trojan-horse1They are: Trojan horses, worms, time bombs, spiders and cancel bots.

 

 

computer-spider1Like I said, read the fine print in a contract and you’ll find a ton of new words!