Well, I never!

I can’t remember where I heard the word but the name attracted my attention right away. Bumptious means offensively self-assertive, or “presumptuously, obtusely, and often noisily self-assertive: obtrusive”. Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bumptious

Remind you of an overbearing, over-exposed, bloated, uneducated conman recently in the news?

 

The Free Dictionary tells us it is an adjective meaning: crudely or loudly assertive; pushy. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bumptious.   And my favorite source for this little gem is the Online Etymology Dictionary with: “assertive,” originated in 1803, probably a humorous coinage of bump and fractious.

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=bumptious

Don’t try and hoodwink me

Put on your deerstalker hat because I have a poser for you. Where in the world did the word hornswoggle originate from? According to Dictionary.com, it’s a slang word that means “to swindle, cheat, hoodwink, or hoax.” Dating from 1815-1825, its origin is unknown. Source: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/hornswoggle

 

 

Another source, A Way With Words, tells us “the word hornswoggle, meaning “to embarrass” or “to swindle,” is of unclear origin, but definitely seems of a piece with U.S. frontier slang from the 1830s and 1840s.” Source: https://www.waywordradio.org/?s=hornswoggle&submit=search

 

 

Determined to root out the origin, I found this inventive etymology for the word: Unknown, 1829 United States. Presumably horns + waggle with humorous faux ablaut or combination with wobble (compare later woggle, 1923), perhaps inspired by lassoed steers trying to escape by moving or waggling their head. Source: https://www.yourdictionary.com/hornswoggle

Another word that just popped into my crazy brain!

A lollapalooza (n.) means “a remarkable or wonderful person or thing”, which is a term that originated in either 1896 or 1901 from American English, also meaning “a fanciful formation”.  Other spellings include: lallapaloosa and lallapalootza.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=lollapalooza

 

 

Google tells us “Lollapalooza is the annual North American alternative pop music concert which started around 1991. It’s a music festival featuring alternative rock, heavy metal, punk rock, hip hop, Electric Dance Music bands, artists, dance and comedy performances and craft booths. It happens in Grant Park, Chicago, IL on Aug 3 – 6, 2017 and has been active for 20 years!”

My ideal…insect

This is a strange word, it has two completely unrelated meanings…which I find fascinating! Let me know if you agree….

Imago is a noun, meaning:
1. The final or adult stage of an insect.

 

 

2. An idealized image of someone, formed in childhood and persisting in later life.

Etymology: From Latin imago (image). Ultimately from the Indo-European root aim- (copy), which also gave us emulate, imitate, image, imagine, and emulous. Earliest documented use: 1787. Source: http://wordsmith.org/words/imago.html

 

 

Our word for today is from wordsmith.org, where you can sign up to receive a word a day via email!

A Sad Goodbye to Mary Tyler Moore

mary-tyler-moore1While watching the Mary Tyler Moore tribute, they used the word “eponymous” referring to her TV show, and I liked the sound of the word so I thought I’d share its meaning and origins with you.

Eponymous is an adjective meaning: 1. Of, relating to, or constituting an eponym, such as “The Mary Tyler Moore” Show.

 

 

he-man_12. Named after something else or deriving from an existing name or word: “Programs such as He-Man and Masters of the Universe … were all created with the explicit purpose of selling the eponymous toys to children”. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/eponymous

 

 

onyma-greek-wordEtymology notes: Eponymous comes from the Greek adjective epōnymos, which is itself from onyma, meaning “name.” “Onyma” has lent its name to a number of English words, including “synonymous,” “pseudonym,” and “anonymous.” Traditionally, an eponymous person or thing (i.e., an “eponym”) might be a mythical ancestor or totem believed to be the source of a clan’s name.

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eponymous

Don’t eat that angletwitch

earthwormAn angletwitch is an earthworm, the word originated in 14th century Merry Olde England from: Middle English angeltwicche, angeltwacche, from Old English angeltwæcce, angeltwicce, from angel hook + -twæcce, -twicce (from twiccian to pluck, catch hold of). Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/angletwitch

 

weird-and-wonderful-words-book-coverThis word was found in the wonderful and often hilarious book: Weird and Wonderful Words, edited by Erin McKean

 

What weird and wonderful words do you have to share today? Please post them in the comments section with their meanings!!

Let us worship words!

oliver-wendell-holmes-sr-quoteOur word for today was found in a page in the Reader’s Digest:  epeolatry, meaning, the worship of words.

Etymology: From Greek, epos (word) + -latry (worship).

 

oliver-wendell-holmes-sr-1The first citation of the word is from Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., in his 1860 book Professor at the Breakfast Table.

For another cool source for new words, visit: http://wordsmith.org/words/epeolatry.html